News

Poltergeist Gin Cocktails
Poltergeist Gin Cocktails
The team at Callington Mill Distillery has curated a selection of our favourite Poltergeist Cocktails for you to enjoy in the comfort of your home.---Poltergeist Gin & Tonic: Ingredients:• 30ml of Poltergeist Unfiltered Gin• 60ml Tonic water from Tonic Tasmanian Company• 10ml Tasmanian Pepper Berries Tonic Syrup• Ice• Garnish (Optional)This drink is equivalent to one standard drink.Preparation:• Place plenty of ice cubes into a chilled glass.• Add 30ml of Poltergeist Unfiltered Gin.• Pour in 60ml of tonic water.• Add 10ml of Tasmanian Pepper Berries Tonic Syrup.• Give it a slight mix to combine.• Add garnish (optional)This Gin & Tonic is refreshing and delicious, with a flavour profile that does not overpower the premium gin. It has a slightly herbal note, giving it a breezy and summery feel, yet it is classic enough to be enjoyed all year round. The Poltergeist gin itself is smooth and balanced, embodying a London dry style that maintains its distinct character.---Poltergeist Negroni:Ingredients:• 30ml of Poltergeist Citrus Gin• 30ml Sweet Red Vermouth• 15ml Campari• 15ml Convict Bitters• Large ice cube• Orange (optional)This drink is equivalent to two standard drinks.Preparation:• Place 1 large ice cube into a glass.• Pour the Poltergeist Citrus Gin, Vermouth, Campari, and bitters over the ice cube.• Stir well.• Garnish with orange wheel (optional)The Negroni is a classic aperitif made entirely of liquor, offering a robust but not overly strong drink. It has a complex flavour profile with notes of cherry, wine, and citrus, balanced by noticeable bitter undertones.---Poltergeist Barrel Aged Martini:Ingredients:• 45ml of Poltergeist Barrel Aged Gin• 30ml Dry Vermouth• Ice• Olives (optional)This drink is equivalent to one and a half standard drinks.Preparation:• Pour all Poltergeist Barrel Aged Gin and Dry Vermouth into a cocktail mixer with ice cubes.• Stir well and strain into a chilled martini cocktail glass.• Garnish with 3 olives on a cocktail stick. (optional)The martini has become one of the best-known mixed alcoholic beverages over the years so why not try our spin on things. The Poltergeist Barrel Aged Martini flavour is intriguing and botanical, perfectly balanced with the subtle tang of the dry vermouth. Delicious.---Nip of GinIngredients:• 30ml of any of our Premium Poltergeist Gins.• 3 cubes of IceThis drink is equivalent to one standard drink.Preparation:Pour the gin into a chilled water or G&T glass over ice.
Learn More
The fascinating history of whisky making in Tasmania
The fascinating history of whisky making in Tasmania
Australians have long been known to appreciate a drink, so it's entirely plausible to think that the first free European settlers began distilling alcohol as soon as they arrived here in the late 18th century. Read on to learn about the fascinating history of whisky making in Tasmania. THE FIRST END TO PROHIBITIONBack then, Tasmania was called Van Diemen's Land in honour of the governor general of the Dutch East Indies. The first non-natives settled on the eastern shore of the River Derwent at Risdon Cove in 1803. A year later, Lieutenant Governor David Collins moved the town across the river and the city of Hobart, Tasmania was born.RIVER DERWENT 1800'SBeer brewing was encouraged in colonial Tasmania, but the distillation of spirits was not. In fact, distilling was illegal until 1822, when then-governor Lachlan Macquarie acquiesced to the notion that people were going to distil spirits no matter what the law said. Macquarie also realised that legalising whisky would stimulate grain production and bring in a healthy amount of tax money, and small batch distilling was declared lawful.  In 1822, Thomas Haigh Midwood opened Australia's first legal distillery. Located in Hobart, Sorell Distillery started making whisky in Tasmania a full two years before Scotland's Glenlivet distillery. Once lawful, more than a dozen new distilleries followed in Midwood's footsteps. Thomas Haigh Midwood's personal success was short-lived, however, because he died in September 1823. DISTILLING BECOMES ILLEGAL AGAIN, BUT ONLY IN TASMANIA Unlike Scotland, where distilleries have been operating non-stop since the 19th century, the legal whisky business in Tasmania lasted but a few short years. In 1839, the Distillation Prohibition Act officially outlawed all distillation in colonial Tasmania, explains Monocle magazine. Lady Jane Franklin, the teetotal wife of then-governor, John Franklin, famously promoted passage of the Act when she proclaimed:  "I would prefer barley be fed to pigs than it be used to turn men into swine." Oddly, the ban on small batch distilling did not extend to mainland Australia but lasted more than a century in Tasmania. In the meantime, Van Diemen's Land changed its name to Tasmania in honour of the first European to get a glimpse of the island we know and love today. JOHN FRANKLINENTER THE GODFATHER OF TASMANIAN WHISKY Prohibition in Tasmania endured until 1992, when a pioneering whisky maker by the name of Bill Lark successfully challenged the unfair and outdated law. Bill Lark was determined to distil first class whisky, but he wanted to do it legally. While researching how to go about getting a distiller's license in Tasmania, he became aware of Australia's utterly antiquated liquor laws that pertained only to the island. In addition to the Distillation Prohibition Act of 1839, there was another perplexing law, the 1901 Distillation Act, which only permitted massive stills that were beyond the scope of small craft whiskey makers. Lark spoke to Tasmanian MP Duncan Kerr about the discriminatory laws. Kerr relayed Lark's concerns to Federal MP Barry Jones. Ultimately, both laws were amended, and Lark Distillery was established as the first legal Tasmanian distillery since 1882. Many locals already wanted to make whisky in Tasmania, and lawmakers didn't put up a fight. In fact, the local customs office may have been as thrilled about the end of prohibition than the local whisky makers. As Bill told Scottish Field magazine: "A lot of people ask me how much of a fight I had to go through, but there was no fight at all. I was pushing at an open door." BILL LARK IT TAKES TIME TO MAKE A GREAT WHISKY Locally sourced barley, pristine water, Tasmanian Highland peat, and hand-selected oak casks are not the only things Lark used to produce the first above-board Tasmanian whisky in a century and a half. It also took time. In 1998, Lark Distillery released their first commercial --and legal-- distilled single malt whisky to exuberant public acclaim. In 2015, Bill Lark became the first distiller from the Southern Hemisphere to be inducted into the Whisky Hall of Fame and he is known as the Godfather of Tasmanian Whisky. MODERN TASMANIAN WHISKY The modern Tasmanian whisky industry that we know today started in the early 1990’s with Lark Distillery founded in 1992 and the Tasmania Distillery which founded in 1994 in Sullivans Cove. Tasmania Distillery changed hands in 1999 and renamed itself Sullivans Cove. The new owners prevailed upon Bill Lark to craft a high-quality single malt whisky. Lark's friend Patrick Maguire ultimately purchased the distillery from the second owners and moved operations to Cambridge. In 2014 Sullivans Cove won the prestigious World Whisky Awards, World's Best Single Malt and really put Tasmanian whisky on the map. Tasmanian Whisky is spelt without the “e” pointing to its Scottish heritage whereas American and Irish Whiskey is spelt with the “e”. The caveat here is another story with Bill Lark at the start of the tale. In the 1990’s a land surveyor, Damian Mackey went to do some work for Bill Lark and Damian observed, and became fascinated by, those early years of the modern Tasmanian Whisky industry. In the early 2000’s Damian began making whisky but he honoured his own Irish heritage by making triple-distilled whisky (technically speaking: whiskey). DAMIAN MACKEY In 2007 Damian and Madeleine Mackey started Mackey’s Distillery in New Town. Eight years later, they and the Kernke family established Shene Distillery, where John Ibrahim later joined as a shareholder. John Ibrahim, whose friendship with the 'Godfather of Tasmanian Whisky,' Bill Lark, led the pair to travel to Scotland where they got a true 'behind the scenes’ look at European whisky making. John knew from that time his future and his legacy were tied to whisky making. John was already a partner with Bill Lark at Old Kempton Distillery before joining the Shene Distillery team.  In 2021 John Ibrahim was instrumental in the sale of Shene Distillery to Lark Distillery in a major win, win for the Tasmanian Whisky industry, providing Lark with a much-needed base and expanded distilling operation, and allowing John the time to focus on Callington Mill Distillery.JOHN IBRAHIMCallington Mill Distillery is a dream come true for John. When establishing the distillery, there were no existing turnkey distillery options available in Tasmania. Thanks to an exciting collaboration with Kolmark’s Mark Kolodziej, and a trip to Cardona Distillery in New Zealand, new equipment was developed specifically for Callington Mill Distillery. The latest Tasmanian technology has been utilised to bring about a new era in Tasmanian Whisky and create a distillery on a scale not previously seen in Tasmania. ‘We have built the Rolls Royce of Whisky Distilleries’ - John Ibrahim CALLINGTON MILL DISTILLERYToday, there are more than 80 whisky distilleries located throughout Tasmania. Far from being rivals, Tasmanian distillers enjoy a collegiate brotherhood and inspire one another to create award-winning whiskies that are enjoyed around the world. The fascinating history of whisky making in Tasmania is only just beginning. Callington Mill’s vision is to become a “world-wide recognisable brand” helping to take Tasmanian Whisky to the next level on the global stage.
Learn More
Callington Mill Cooperage - Where “Oak Matters Most”
Callington Mill Cooperage - Where “Oak Matters Most”
We all know that single malt whisky is made from water, barley, yeast and then its matured in Oak - but oak doesn’t receive the acknowledgment it deserves in the whisky making process.100% of the colour and up to 70-80% of the complex flavours comes from the Cask and from the previous wine or spirit that that Cask previously held.Oak, predominately via the inside charring of the Cask, also filters & removes unpleasant and undesirable sulphur compounds during the maturation process.But that’s not all - between 25% to 50% of the whisky is lost in evaporation during maturation - this is referred to as the “angel’s share.”These combined “additive” & “subtractive” features of the maturation process dramatically influences the final character and composition of the whiskey. That’s why we established our own Cooperage in 2016 - in order to have direct control over Callington Mill’s entire Oak regime.We also have strategic alliances with Cooperages in Spain & Portugal; supplying premium American, European and French Oak Casks that previously held ex fortified wine - like Port from the Douro Valley wine region in Porto Portugal to Sherry from the renowned Sherry triangle region in Jerez de la Frontera Spain.This ex fortified Oak regime is extremely costly - about 10 times more expensive than say ex bourbon casks. However, this Oak regime is the backbone of Callington Mill’s identity - providing character and flavour complexity that we are renowned for and endeavour to continuously evolve - a rich, tearing and viscous whisky - bursting with flavours of dark chocolate, raisins, figs, nuts, coffee, caramel, apricots and honey - ranging in colour from gold, amber to chestnut & deep mahogany.A truely complex, elegant and full bodied whisky. Why do we use 30 Litre casks?Being a start up distillery & In order to have our whisky matured in 3-4 years; we adopted an initial maturation regime in 30 litre casks. The smaller cask allows for greater whisky to wood surface ratio & oak interaction - thereby accelerating the maturation process as compared with a much bigger cask. This however is a much more costly process again - about 13 times more costly per litre of whisky.This cost is not sustainable in the long term - but we felt we needed to absorb this initial cost in order to have quality whisky available to market at an earlier time frame.At Callington Mill we believe that in order to master the whisky making process - we need to Master the Oak process.Therefore at Callington Mill we believe ‘Oak Matters Most.’
Learn More
The Pure Art of Whisky: Why Callington Mill Distillery Neither Chill Filters Nor Flocks
The Pure Art of Whisky: Why Callington Mill Distillery Neither Chill Filters Nor Flocks
When it comes to the crafting of a fine single malt whisky, every step matters. From the quality of the barley to the whispering influence of oak barrels, every detail plays a role in giving life to the spirit that enthrals connoisseurs worldwide. At Callington Mill Distillery, we have always upheld the principles of purity and authenticity. That's why we have chosen not to chill filter or use flocculation techniques on our whiskies. Let’s delve into the reasons behind these decisions. THE ESSENCE OF CHILL FILTRATIONChill filtration is a process often used in the whisky industry to remove certain compounds from the spirit, mainly fatty acids, esters, and proteins. The goal? To prevent the whisky from becoming cloudy when cooled or when water is added. Here's how it works: The whisky is cooled down, often to around 0°C (32°F), which causes these compounds to solidify or "flock." These solid particles are then easily removed through filtration. While this process does produce a clear spirit, it's essential to understand that these compounds – the very ones removed during chill filtration – play a significant role in the flavour and mouthfeel of the whisky. THE CASE AGAINST CHILL FILTRATION By opting not to chill filter, we preserve the richness and full-bodied character of our whisky. The compounds that might be removed in the process are responsible for enhancing the texture and depth of the spirit. They add to the overall experience, making each sip a journey of complex tastes and aromas. Yes, our whisky may turn slightly hazy under cold conditions or when water is added. But this is a natural testament to its authenticity, a sign that you are enjoying the whisky in its most genuine form. SAYING NO TO FLOCCULATION Flocculation is another method to clear up the spirit - by removing fats and esters that solidify or ‘flock’ under cold temperatures on bottom of a vessel - the very fats and esters that add flavour, richness and mouth feel to the whisky. While effective in making the whisky ‘look’ clear, it's another step away from the purity that defines Callington Mill Distillery. Our approach has always been to let nature and craftsmanship dictate the course of our whisky. By avoiding artificial means to clear the spirit, we ensure that our patrons experience the whisky as it was meant to be: pure, unaltered, and full of character. At Callington Mill Distillery, we believe in transparency and dedication to the art of whisky-making. Our decision to eschew chill filtration and flocculation is a testament to our commitment to delivering a product that is as close to its natural state as possible. Each bottle from our distillery is a celebration of tradition, craftsmanship, and the raw beauty of nature. By enjoying our whisky, you're not just savoring a drink; you're experiencing a legacy. Cheers to the authentic spirit!
Learn More
Refreshing whisky cocktails to try this Summer
Refreshing whisky cocktails to try this Summer
When you’re asked to think about whisky you usually picture yourself sitting by the crackling fire in a comfortable armchair, sipping on your favourite dram on a brisk winter’s evening. However, whisky isn’t just for the cooler months, it’s also refreshing and thirst-quenching on a warm summers day. Single Malt Whisky makes for the perfect ingredient in your next summer cocktail, with flavours to suit everyone’s taste buds. The misconception that wood-aged spirits should be consumed in winter is a direct result of the commonly known warm finish that whisky leaves, but at Callington Mill, we say you can drink your whisky however and whenever you enjoy it the most. Here are a few recommendations for Summer whisky drinking; Diluting your dram with a few large ice cubes is a fantastic way to refresh your drink this Summer. This is particularly suited for whiskies with a higher ABV. Another recommendation is to experiment with new whiskies, like the Callington Mill Leap of Faith series where you will find a range of double and triple distilled Single Malt Whiskies to suit everyone’s taste buds.Here are our favourite refreshing whisky cocktails for your summer. Enjoy them at a weekend BBQ with friends or poolside with your favourite novel. THE RATTLESNAKEThis well-balanced fruity cocktail is perfect on a warm summer afternoon. Invite your friends over to share this delightful cocktail, as this recipe serves 4. The Rattlesnake encompasses the timeless notes of orange peel that lead into the lemon palate of Callington Mill’s Single Malt Whisky, Symmetry. The perfect axis of uniformity and balance. Give this summer whisky cocktail a try.Ingredients - 4 eggs whites - ½ cup boiling water - ½ cup caster sugar - 180ml of Callington Mill Single Malt Whisky, Symmetry - 120ml lemon juice - Dash of bitters (for serving) Step 1 - Chill coupe glasses in the freezer. Combine the boiling water and caster sugar to make simple syrup. Stir the mixture until sugar is completely dissolved. Leave the simple syrup to cool for approximately 1 hour.Step 2 - For each cocktail combine 1 egg white, 30ml of simple syrup, 45ml whisky and 30ml lemon juice into a cocktail shaker. Forcefully shake, without ice, until the mixture is frothy. Step 3 - Fill the shaker with ice and shake vigorously for approximately 30 seconds, or until the outside of the shaker is frosty.Step 4  - Strain the cocktail through a fine-mesh sieve into the coupe and serve with a dash of bitters on top.WHISKY SOURThis whisky sour is a bright and zesty cocktail that will leave you refreshed and wanting more. Encompassing notes of citrus and sweet honey, this recipe pairs perfectly with Callington Mill’s Single Malt Whisky, Apera Fusion. Here is what you’ll need for one serving.Ingredients- 60ml Callington Mill Single Malt Whisky, Apera Fusion- 30ml freshly squeezed lemon juice - 30ml simply syrup- 1/2 an orange wheel for serving- 1 Maraschino cherry for serving Step 1 - Combine the lemon juice, whisky and simple syrup into a cocktail shaker. Step 2 - Fill the shaker with ice and shake for approximately 30 seconds, or until the shaker becomes frosty. Step 3  - Strain cocktail into a lowball filled with ice and garnish with cherry and orange wheel.STRAWBERRY WHISKY LEMONADEIf you are having friends over for a weekend pool party and are after a beverage everyone will love, this is the perfect cocktail for you. This refreshing yet simple summer cocktail suits a sweeter palate and perfectly ties into Callington Mill’s Emulsion Single Malt Whisky. The light and silky palate combined of strawberries and peaches, makes this bright and vibrant whisky emerge within the cocktail.Strawberry Syrup Ingredients - 1 cup of cup strawberries - ½ cup of sugar - ¼ cup of water Cocktail Ingredients - ⅓ cup of strawberry syrup - 60ml Callington Mill Emulsion Single Malt Whisky - 30ml lemon juice - Fresh cust strawberries and lemon slices for garnish Strawberry SyrupStep 1 - Over a saucepan on low heat combine the strawberries, sugar, water and stir.Step 2 - Bring the mixture to a simmer and cook for approximately 15 minutes, or until strawberries are soft and sugar has dissolved. Remove the saucepan from the heat and cool for 10-15 minutes.Step 3 - Strain syrup into a bowl through a mesh strainer.CocktailStep 1 - Combine strawberry syrup, whisky and lemon juice into a shaker.Step 2 - Add ice and shake for 30 seconds or until the shaker becomes frosty.Step 3 - Pour whisky lemonade over ice into a lowball glass. Garnish with fresh strawberries and lemon slices.Give our summer whisky cocktails a try and let us know how magnificent they taste. Feel free to put your own unique twist on our favourite whisky cocktails for your summer.The Leap of Faith series is so refreshing, you don’t have to mix them into a cocktail to appreciate the flavourful notes. Each Single Malt Whisky is refreshing enough to enjoy on its own, however you prefer your dram.
Learn More
Oatlands, Tasmania: The history of our beautiful town
Oatlands, Tasmania: The history of our beautiful town
Few towns in Australia meld past and present as seamlessly as Oatlands, Tasmania. Thanks to its location between Launceston and Hobart, Oatlands was the natural choice for a colonial military base which housed the convicts who were responsible for constructing most of the town's historic buildings, bridges, and roads. Today, the Southern Midlands Council works in concert with the Centre for Heritage to preserve these historical assets while ensuring their continued re-use and conservation. Read on to learn more about the fascinating history of Oatlands, Tasmania. The town of which we're so proud was established in 1821 (but of course the area has been inhabited by aboriginal tribes for tens of thousands of years.) By 1837 the town featured a post office, a railway, 50 miles of well laid out streets, and a flour mill built by Cornwall native, John Vincent. Oatlands continued to thrive into the 1900s, but by the end of the 20th century, the railway had closed, and the once prosperous town was struggling.One reason that Oatlands found itself falling on harder times was the 'improvement' of the major thoroughfare that connected Hobart and Launceston. After the Midland Highway was widened and realigned between the 1960s and '80s, it bypassed Oatlands completely. In the 21st century, however, Oatlands is witnessing a resurgence of visitors and the town is poised to become an important tourist destination, explains Tasmanian Times.Although Oatlands is home to fewer than 600 full time residents, our charming Tasmanian town boasts a remarkable number of fascinating attractions. From the only functioning Lincolnshire-style windmill in the southern hemisphere to Australia's largest assortment of quarried sandstone houses, Oatlands offers visitors and locals a splendid selection of things to see and do along with world-class food and drink.HIGH STREET WALKING TOWN Oatlands is well known for its amazing assortment of convict-constructed sandstone structures, including the oldest supreme court house in rural Australia. History buffs and students of architecture are sure to enjoy a self-guided walking tour of the High Street where dozens of sandstone stables, cottages, and public buildings await exploration. Many Oatlands businesses offer free maps and brochures that explain the history of individual buildings. Oatlands visitor guides can also be found and printed online. If you don't have time to visit all 40 or so Georgian sandstone buildings on High Street, Aussie Towns recommends focusing on Oatlands Wood Cottage at the corner of High Street and Stanley Street and Holyrood House which is a former grammar school that sits at 40 High Street. At 79 High Street, you'll find the Commissariat Store and Guard House which is the oldest standing structure in the Military Precinct of Oatlands. Elm Cottage at 82 High Street and the Lake Frederick Inn at 99 High Street are other must-see sandstone buildings that make Oatlands such a special place.MILL LANE DISTRICT When John Vincent built our wonderful Callington Mill in the mid-1830s, the windmill that operated two pairs of French burr stones was state-of-the-art technology. Powered by shuttered sails that could be opened and closed by pulling outside chains, the mill produced flour solely by wind power before Vincent added a steam-driven mill in 1846. Unfortunately, larger mills captured the majority of the bakers market, and in 1910, an errant spark ignited a fire that immolated everything but the stone tower. Eventually, the tower was lined with concrete and served for many years as a water tank.Over the sixty or so years that Callington Mill served as a mill, Vincent utilized local grains to produce then-illegal whisky that he served at the pubs and hotels he also owned. In 2021, Callington Mill and the other buildings in the mill precinct have been painstakingly restored to their former glory and the whisky we produce at Callington Mill Distillery today is not only delicious – it's also totally legal. Anyone planning a trip to Tasmania should come and see us at Callington Mill Distillery. Here visitors can observe the inner workings of Tasmania's largest distillery from a viewing platform before or after touring the distillery itself and learning all about our single malt whisky. On-site dining at the Cellar Door will be available from 2022, making the Callington Mill Distillery a truly remarkable attraction for tourists and locals alike.LUKE DULVERTON The sandstone that comprises the historic structures of Oatlands was quarried from nearby Lake Dulverton. A major drought that began in the last decade of the 20th century left the lake bed almost dry until welcomed rains refilled the shallow lake in 2010. Today, Lake Dulverton offers well maintained walking paths from which visitors can enjoy an abundance of wildlife including beautiful black swans, says Trip Advisor. DINNER, DRINKS, AND A BED If exploring the historic sandstone structures of Oatlands or wandering the shores of Lake Dulverton leaves you with an appetite, The Kentish Tasmania has you covered. Built in the 1830s and recently restored, this popular country pub offers delicious dining that features the finest local proteins and produce as well as an in-house bakery that turns out tasty pies, pastries, and cakes. The Kentish Tasmania also offers comfortable accommodations that make it an ideal home base for your next trip to Tas. Fans of wine, cheese, and local spirits find a lot to love at The Imbibers Located at 74 High Street in Oatlands, this friendly venue offers a range of Tasmanian ciders, wines, and handcrafted whiskies that match anything Scotland has to offer. Let your server pair wines and cheeses, or purchase a bottle to take back to your room. The Imbibers boasts three 19th century cottages where visitors can get a good night's sleep.After learning about the fascinating history of Oatlands, Tasmania, it's now is a great time to start planning your visit. If you have any questions about Oatlands or our wonderful handcrafted whiskies, contact Callington Mill Distillery.
Learn More
World renowned Poltergeist Gin now distilled in a new home.
World renowned Poltergeist Gin now distilled in a new home.
When John Ibrahim facilitated the recent sale of Shene Distillery to Lark Distillery, the deal was a win-win for the Tasmanian whisky industry. Not only did the move provide Lark Distillery with a beautiful base, an impressive Cellar Door, a great deal of whisky under maturation and much needed expanded distilling opportunities, it also brought the superb Poltergeist Gin to Callington Mill Distillery. Callington Mill Distillery, as part of the same sale, has acquired the rights and stock of Poltergeist Gin and as John Ibrahim was a shareholder in Shene Distillery and is the owner of Callington Mill, it feels like Poltergeist is coming home. The original “recipe” was developed by the incomparable Damian Mackey, some of our Leap of Faith series whiskies were also developed in collaboration with Damian. Callington Mill is extremely proud to be honouring the legacy of this multi award winning Gin.DAMIAN MACKEY If you have not tried Poltergeist, you're in got a ghostly treat.AN OVERVIEW OF POLTERGEIST GINRobustly botanical and full-flavoured, Poltergeist is everything you want a gin to be. Handcrafted with local and globally sourced ingredients, Poltergeist offers a beautifully bold taste to discerning gin lovers everywhere. In addition to pure clean Tasmanian water, this uniquely flavoured gin is distilled with:● Angelica● Cardamom● Cassia (cinnamon) bark● Chinese liquorice root● Coriander seeds● Juniper● Lemon peel● Orris root● Star anise● Tasmanian grown lemon myrtle● Tasmanian grown macadamia nuts● Tasmanian grown mountain pepper berriesBOTANCIALS: TASTING NOTESWith a bright, clear appearance, Poltergeist Gin provides an intriguing aroma of Australian lemon myrtle and sweet mixed citrus. At first sip, this oh-so pleasant gin offers a creamy mouthfeel that segues into fresh, woodsy tones before finishing into a slightly subtler citrus smoothness that lingers on the palate. Nicks Wine Merchants describes Poltergeist Gin as a piney, sap-scented gin with a bouquet that breaks loose from the glass and deepens with air contact. Enjoy this gin straight to observe the way it enters the palate, with full botanical flavour that intensifies into warm pepper midway, before ending with graceful and savoury citrus notes.NO GIN MORE HONOURED THAN POLTERGEISTPoltergeist is the only gin in the world to win platinum awards at the prestigious San Francisco World Spirits Competition platinum award two years* in a row. As if that weren't impressive enough, Poltergeist has also received:2017 San Francisco World Competition Double Gold Award2017 World Gin Awards Double Gold Award2018 San Francisco World Competition Double Gold Award2019 San Francisco World Spirit Competition Platinum Award*2019 Singapore World Spirits Competition Gold Award2020 San Francisco World Spirit Competition Double Gold Award2020 San Francisco World Spirit Competition Platinum Award*2020 World Gin Awards Gold Award2021 San Francisco World Spirit Competition Gold AwardHOW IT'S MADEWe start by macerating a dozen botanicals in copper pot stills for more than 20 hours before running the still an additional 12 to 14 hours to produce a bold, bright gin that comes in at a Blend in a shaker, or mix in a glass before garnishing with a twist of lemon or an olive. To make a classic Gibson, garnish with a cocktail onion. whopping 78 percent alcohol by volume. Once distilled, Poltergeist Unfiltered is diluted with pristine Tasmanian water to a palatable 46 percent ABV. UNFILTEREDMany distillers filter their gin to prevent the natural clouding that occurs when gin comes in contact with water. Understanding that umpteen gin drinkers prefer a little louching, Poltergeist gin at Callington Mill Distillery is Unfiltered. WHAT GHOSTING IS AND WHY IT HAPPENSTechnically known as "louching," ghosting is the natural result of botanical oils coming into contact with water. Louching may be visible in chilled bottles of gin, as well. This cloudy, milky, or opaque appearance happens because the anise, juniper, liquorice, and other aromatic oils that give Poltergeist its amazing flavour are not soluble in water. Louching doesn't alter the taste of world-class gin. In fact, many people prefer it.WAYS TO ENJOY POLTERGEIST GINAt 46 percent alcohol by volume, this beautifully bold gin can be enjoyed on its own, especially when shared with good company after midnight. If neat gin isn't your preference, go ahead and mix it with tonic and garnish with an apple slice and a few black peppercorns.POLTERGEIST GIN JAM COCKTAIL This yummy cocktail is as delicious in wintertime as it is in summer. Here's how to make it:Put 45 ml Poltergeist Unfiltered Gin, 15 ml dry cassis, 15 ml fresh lime juice, and one teaspoon of strawberry jam into a cocktail shaker. Agitate vigorously before straining the concoction into an iced highball glass. Top with club soda and garnish with sprigs of rosemary and mint.POLTERGEIST MARTINI If your experience with martinis extends only to the vodka variety, it's definitely time to try a classic dry gin martini. Shaken or stirred, the ingredients are simple and the results superb.● 2 ½ ounces Poltergeist Gin● ½ ounce dry vermouth● 1 dash aromatic bittersBlend in a shaker, or mix in a glass before garnishing with a twist of lemon or an olive. To make a classic Gibson, garnish with a cocktail onion.The new home of Poltergeist Gin at Callington Mill Distillery, sits at 6 Mill Lane in Oatlands, Tasmania. If you have any questions about our award-winning whiskies and gins, contact us at +61 482 509 019, or send your email inquiry to info@callingtonmilldistillery.com.au
Learn More
How to perfectly pair whisky with food
How to perfectly pair whisky with food
When one thinks about matching food with alcohol, wine with dinner usually comes to mind. Pairings such as hearty beef stew with a robust red wine or a lemony seafood dish served with a light pinot grigio are classic combinations. What you might not know is that whisky can also be paired with food, as long as you do it right. For the first centuries of its existence, whisky was considered a stand-alone drink best served neat or with a splash of water. Today, whisky connoisseurs and foodies enjoy myriad combinations of whisky and food that please the palate and delight the senses.Marrying whisky and cuisine is an idea whose time has come, but do proceed with caution. In lieu of overlapping flavours, strive for a harmonious pairing that brings out the best in both. Don't attempt to match food to a particular whisky's palate. Remember, the goal is to amplify, not overwhelm.WHAT WHISKY EXPERTS SAYPairing whisky with food in a harmonious manner is a matter of contrasting and complementing flavours, says DrinkMe magazine spirits specialist, Ilona Thompson. The spirits specialist explains that the idea behind coupling libations with food is not to overwhelm either, but to enhance both. In her educated opinion, Thompson notes that lighter whiskies pair perfectly with raw fish dishes like sashimi and sushi, while moderate-to-medium whiskies work wonderfully with roast pork, lamb, and game meats. Full-bodied whisky marries marvelously with smoked salmon, Indian cuisine, and strong blue cheese.Recommended pairings: ● Mineral-driven whisky with sushi● Rye whisky with smoked salmon● Peaty whiskies with bold bouef bourgignon● Aged scotch with orange-flavored dark chocolate● Sherry oak-finished scotch with chocolate soufflé● Bourbon with spiced apple pie● Single malt whisky with crème-brulee● Scotch with pineapple upside-down cake Pair Quintessence with Crème-Brulee.CASKS MATTER, TOOWhisky aged in casks that previously held bourbon tend to be lighter and sweeter with hints of tropical fruits and vanilla. For this reason bourbon-casked whiskies are the ideal complement to desserts and delicate dishes.Robust whisky seasoned in European sherry casks trend toward heavier, more flavourful foods such as aged cheeses and roasted almonds. When it comes to nuts and whisky, opposites attract. For instance, sip a sweet whisky with bitter nuts, but go for a stronger dram when you pair it with sweet nuts. And, speaking of sweets, did you know that whisky can pair nicely with chocolate? CHOCOLATE AND WHISKYAs a general rule of thumb, stronger whiskies pair best with darker chocolates. Whiskies of the World suggests experimenting with good-quality chocolate bars in lieu of super-sweet chocolate. Pair Tango with Dark Chocolate.Dark, orange-flavoured chocolate bars meld marvelously with the citrus notes of Scotch, while less intense milk chocolate pairs nicely with rye, especially when the chocolate offers a hint of chili or ginger. Single malt whisky such as Callington Symmetry calls for a bowlful of chocolate-covered salted hazelnuts.EXCEPTIONAL IDEAS FOR PAIRING CALLINGTON MILL WHISKIESTriple-distilled Sherry Fusion Single Malt WhiskyEvolved to perfection in Spanish sherry casks, this lightly-coloured, seductively spicy single malt whisky marries well when it meets dark chocolate and/or mature cheddar cheese. The prestigious International Wine & Spirit Competition is not a food-pairing event per se, but the panel of expert judges at the 2022 event awarded Sherry Fusion a silver medal while describing Callington's potent offering as "juicy yet peppery with a wine-influenced finish." Pair Sherry Fusion with Cheddar Cheese.Symmetry Single Malt WhiskyAztec gold in colour, double-distilled Symmetry opens with notes of caramel and apricots before blooming into an array of palate-pleasing flavours, including buttered popcorn and sweet toffee undertones. Try this delightful dram with soft cheese, smoked salmon, tuna, or dressed crab for a flavour experience you won't soon forget. Pair Symmetry with Tuna.Audacity Single Malt WhiskyDeeply amber with hefty notes of cocoa, tobacco, and vanilla custard, double-distilled Audacity goes just right with marbled steak, caramelised root vegetables, and your favourite homemade meatloaf. Pair Audacity with Steak.ADVICE FROM FOOD PAIRING EXPERTSNoting that a splash of water may improve a whisky's ability to couple with food, Fiona Beckett at Matching Food & Wine explains that strong, peaty whiskies marry nicely with anchovy spread, smoked salmon, tea-smoked chicken, and Roquefort or other intense blue cheeses. Light, slightly sweet whisky works with:● Bread and butter pudding● Cock-a-leekie soup● Parsnip soup● Smoked haddock soup● Soft, creamy cheeses● Sushi Medium-bodied whisky goes nicely with:● Black cod● Duck liver paté● Guinea fowl with creamy wild mushroom sauce● Roasted pheasant● Seared scallops wrapped with bacon● Smoked duck● Smoked mackerel, mussels, and oysters● Smoked venison Full-bodied, sherry cask-finished whisky pairs well with:● Char siu pork● Christmas pudding● Dark chocolate brownies● Ginger biscuits● Gingerbread● Grilled steak● Mince pies● Pecan pie● Rich cakes● Roast venison● Sticky toffee puddingWHISKY AND BREADMany whisky lovers appreciate a nibble while they sip. Considering that whisky is derived from grain, it naturally pairs with bread. A hunk of freshly-baked white pullman-style sandwich bread goes nicely with lighter whiskies whereas whole wheat or mixed grain bread pairs perfectly with a more substantial, heartier dram. You can order Warmed Sourdough at our Cellar Door which matches perfectly with Emulsion. Not surprisingly, the dense and slightly peppery flavour of European-style light rye bread pairs well with somewhat sweet rye whiskies. Darker rye bread works well with American straight rye whisky, and deeply dark pumpernickel accents and envelops smoky whisky, especially when the bread is toasted, explains Whisky Advocate.READY TO EAT?If all this talk about food and whisky has given you an appetite, you are cordially invited to browse Callington Mill Distillery to find the perfect whisky for what you have in mind. A good place to start is with our Leap of Faith series that features eight new double- and triple-distilled whiskies that are sure to inspire.If you are planning a visit to historical Oatlands, be sure to include Callington Mill Distillery in your travel itinerary. Here you can see first-hand how the largest distillery in Tasmania operates before discovering a perfect pairing of whisky and food at our on-site eatery, the Cellar Door. Pair our many Single Malt Whiskies with our sumptuous Cellar Door menu, featuring vegetarian, vegan, dairy-free and gluten-free options. To see our menu or reserve a table, visit our Cellar Door page. Callington Mill Distillery proudly sits at 6 Mill Lane, Oatlands. The Distillery and Cellar Door is open Wednesday - Sunday, from 10am to 4pm. We look forward to seeing you there.
Learn More
Here's why Tasmania is perfect for making whisky.
Here's why Tasmania is perfect for making whisky.
With so many awards in recent years, it's obvious that Tasmanian whisky makers are doing something very right. Is it the local water, or is it the barley? Could it be the climate? Actually, Taz boasts the ideal combination of location, weather, and locally-sourced ingredients that make it the perfect place for making whisky. Plus LOVE of course. Tasmania's own Callington Mill Distillery practically swept the 2022 San Francisco World Spirits Competition with eight awards for single malt whisky and additionally a medal for its incomparable Poltergeist Gin.  Four of the awards for Callington Mill Single Malt Whisky were highly regarded Double Gold awards, identifying them as "among the finest products in the world."ALMOST AS SCOTTISH AS SCOTLANDDespite the lack of Hebridean gorse and the presence of local eucalyptus, Tasmania sometimes feels closer to Scotland than to Sydney, said The Guardian in a 2014 article that went on to extol the area's cool air, grey skies, lush countryside, local highland peat, and abundance of impeccably clean water that make Tasmania an ideal location for distilling spirits.THE FORESIGHT OF BILL LARK Heralded as the Godfather of modern Tasmanian whisky, Bill Lark was well aware of our favourite island's potential for producing world-class whisky years before bringing forth his first bottles. As Broadsheet tells the story, Lark and his father in law were enjoying each other's company on a fishing trip in the highlands when the pair put forth the idea of using the local barley, water, peat, and climate to produce whisky that could rival Scotland. In 1992, Lark did just that, opening the first small, legal distillery in Tasmania in more than 150 years.WATERAs whisky's main component, water has everything to do with the final product of any distillery. It is well known that the water that flows from the Tasmanian highland rainforests to the midlands to the Blackman River is some of the most pristine H20 anywhere on Earth. Tasmanian Rain, a company that catches, bottles, and sells local rainwater, explains that the air currents that bring rain to Tasmania's western shores originate in Antarctica before traveling across thousands of miles of open ocean, resulting in water that is clean, refreshing, and without impurities. Unlike England where water is generally hard, or high in mineral content, Scotland's water tends to be as soft as rainwater and just right for making whisky. The same can be said for Tasmania, where water hardness levels rarely exceed 10 mg per litre, explains Tales of Travelling Sisters. Acidity, or pH of Tasmanian stream water typically ranges between 5.5 and 7.5 except for humic-rich Tassie lakes and rivers with a pH range of 4.0 to 6.5, explains the Department of Natural Resources and Environment Tasmania. Even if you drink your whisky neat, you may enjoy diluting it a bit with spring water before imbibing. In fact, Scottish pubs always present a jug of the stuff whenever whisky is ordered, notes Whisky magazine.BARLEY One of the most famous phrases ever uttered about barley came from the lips of Lady Jane Franklin, wife of Governor John Franklin who exclaimed: "I would prefer barley be fed to pigs than it be used to turn men into swine."Today, whisky aficionados the world over appreciate the humble grain's contribution to adult enjoyment much more than Lady Jane Franklin ever did. She convinced her husband to outlaw the distilling of spirits in Tasmania. Tasmania is perfectly positioned to take full advantage of the barley that thrives in our locale. Hordeum vulgare (Barley) is a tolerant crop that tends to flourish in well-drained Tasmanian soils and does not require a lot of supplementary irrigation, explains the Australian Department of Natural Resources. Bill Lark described the traditional brewing barley he exclusively used to craft his superb whisky as advantageous due to its "big fat oily malt" flavour. Callington Mill is another Tassie distillery that only uses the locally-sourced barley that makes Tasmanian whisky a serious contender on the world whisky stage. Without it, a dram might be good, but it would not measure up to the award-winning bottles produced by local distillers. CLIMATEThe maritime temperate climate of Tasmania with its long hot summer days, short cold winter days, plentiful sunshine, and generally low humidity is just right for distilling single malt whisky. Here in Tasmania, the air is as clean as the water. So clean, in fact, that the World Meteorological Organization–Global Atmosphere Watch maintains a Baseline Air Pollution monitor station on the island. To learn more about Tasmania's clean air see this article. HIGHLAND PEATIn the 20th century, Australian whisky makers relied on imported Scottish peat to dry and smoke locally-grown barley. It was not until the 1990s that Tasmanian highland peat was considered a viable option, when Lyn and Bill Lark became the first legal modern distillers in Taz. Today, some Tassie distillers employ Taz-grown peat to deliver the subtle, earthy smokiness that makes local “peaty” malt whisky such a delight.COPPER STILLS AND OAK CASKS Ingredients, climate, and water contribute mightily to Tasmanian whisky, but they're not the only factors that matter. The stills in which whisky is distilled and the casks in which it ages are also imperative to the quality of the final product. Copper pot stills such as those used by Callington Mill are not only beautiful to look at, they interact in a positive way with vapour during distillation. Inside a copper still, fruity esters are developed and volatile sulfur compounds, including ethyl carboxamide, trimethyl-sulphide, and dimethyl trisulphide are removed, explains Scotch Whisky magazine. Another plus to copper stills is the way the natural element inhibits bacterial contamination.Casks also figure into the final flavour of whisky. This is why Callington Mill matures exclusively in Oak casks sourced and crafted by our own Callington Mill Cooperage. Callington Mill’s Oak policy determines our whiskey profile - our final character - our DNA. We predominately use the best quality ex fortified wine Oak Casks from the Douro Valley in Porto Portugal and from the Sherry Triangle region Jerez de la Frontera in Andalucia Spain. We also source the best Australian ex fortified wines. This represents 80% of our Oak strategy. In order to add layers of diversity and complexity we source the remaining 20% of our oak program from the exotic regions of the world - France - Mexico - Jamaica - South America - US - Japan. We are also trying to secure Oak supply from regions never before used in whiskey making. This will remain a secret - so stay tuned.  Now that you understand why Tasmania is the perfect place to make the perfect whisky, we hope you will try it for yourself. If you have any questions about our ingredients, contact us and ask us anything. 
Learn More